Windows 8 Died at Launch, Microsoft Moves on to Windows 9

http://news.yahoo.com/windows-8-died-launch-microsoft-moves-windows-9-231606647.html
Microsoft attempted something different and daring with Windows 8. “Had they done a more transitionary product, especially keeping the Start button, I don’t think the impact and perception would have been as bad.” By removing the Start button, which had been a Windows fixture since Windows 95, Microsoft wasn’t just introducing a new way of using the operating system — it was trying to force people away from the only one they had known for two decades.

Congresswoman Bravely Stands Up for ISPs’ Rights to Deliver Inferior Service With No Competition

http://news.yahoo.com/congresswoman-bravely-stands-isps-rights-deliver-inferior-no-213050464.html
Chattanooga, Tennessee’s municipal broadband network offers affordable broadband service that just happens to deliver the same 1Gbps peak speeds as Google Fiber. Given this apparent success story, you would think that state government officials would be happy to see other municipalities experiment with building their own fiber networks or to at least let Chattanooga expand its fiber service to more areas. After intense lobbying from incumbent ISPs, Tennessee’s state legislature slapped major restrictions on cities’ and towns’ ability to build out their own fiber networks, which means that Chattanooga will not be allowed to expand its network out to more areas as the city had previously planned.

Fifty Years of BASIC, the Programming Language That Made Computers Personal

Originally posted on TIME:

Knowing how to program a computer is good for you, and it’s a shame more people don’t learn to do it.

For years now, that’s been a hugely popular stance. It’s led to educational initiatives as effortless sounding as the Hour of Code (offered by Code.org) and as obviously ambitious as Code Year (spearheaded by Codecademy).

Even President Obama has chimed in. Last December, he issued a YouTube video in which he urged young people to take up programming, declaring that “learning these skills isn’t just important for your future, it’s important for our country’s future.”

I find the “everybody should learn to code” movement laudable. And yet it also leaves me wistful, even melancholy. Once upon a time, knowing how to use a computer was virtually synonymous with knowing how to program one. And the thing that made it possible was a programming language called BASIC.

John Kemeny John…

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